Things I Love

a few of my favourite things...

circusshiz:

IMG_3354a small by pluckphotography on Flickr.
mpdrolet:

Circus People, c. 1929-30
August Sander

mpdrolet:

Circus People, c. 1929-30

August Sander

(via mylittlenestofvipers)

owls-love-tea:

reneenault
gailsimone:


the preeminent gail simone of our time

One’s too many and a hundred ain’t enough.

gailsimone:

the preeminent gail simone of our time

One’s too many and a hundred ain’t enough.

(Source: dee-lirious, via kateordie)

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Winnie Truong

2014

1. Pearl

2. Siren

3. Debutante

4. Left Abashed

5. Oblivion

6. Slight

7. Mature Buds

8. Girl in Between

Website

(via mylittlenestofvipers)

gothiccircusyogi:

Masha Terentieva

gothiccircusyogi:

Masha Terentieva

(via fuckyeahcircus)

danibowerphotography:

The Black Widowcontinued

Working with aerialist dancers Elena Carter and Cole Conner.

(via fuckyeahcircus)

novellart:

Pauliina and Salva from the Cirque du Soleil.

(Source: spazmaticdanceaddict, via fuckyeahcircus)

vitazur:

Jean Giraud

vitazur:

Jean Giraud

(via mylittlenestofvipers)

comicsalliance:

Art and Superheroines: When Over-Sexualization Kills the Story [Sex]A common problem for cape comics is what is best termed an out-of-proportion amount of sexualized art. It probably has its roots in superheroes as a power fantasy for boys, and it follows logically, if a bit sadly, that women would be portrayed as the ideal sexual partner, rather than an objectively idealized character. Whatever the reason, we’re mired in crappy sexualization. And the problem isn’t just what that means for women, but what it means for the craft and quality of the comic. Imagery that prizes sexualization above all else — especially when that doesn’t make sense for the story — can pull you out of the moment and stop your reading experience dead.READ MORE

comicsalliance:

Art and Superheroines: When Over-Sexualization Kills the Story [Sex]

A common problem for cape comics is what is best termed an out-of-proportion amount of sexualized art. It probably has its roots in superheroes as a power fantasy for boys, and it follows logically, if a bit sadly, that women would be portrayed as the ideal sexual partner, rather than an objectively idealized character. Whatever the reason, we’re mired in crappy sexualization. And the problem isn’t just what that means for women, but what it means for the craft and quality of the comic. Imagery that prizes sexualization above all else — especially when that doesn’t make sense for the story — can pull you out of the moment and stop your reading experience dead.

READ MORE

(via mylittlenestofvipers)